Mimico

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OVERVIEW

Mimico is the gateway to Toronto’s west-end waterfront neighbourhoods. This established community is well known for its scenic lakefront parks and excellent recreational facilities. Mimico is within a short commute of downtown Toronto and features its own Go Transit train station located on Royal York Road. (1)

Mimico residents come out in droves to show their community spirit at a number of local events including the annual “Lakeshore Community Festival” and the Etobicoke-Lakeshore Christmas Parade. There is also an annual “Mimico Festival” held every August in Amos Waites Park. This event is always followed by a kite flying contest held the next day at Humber Bay Park. (1)

The area’s seen a huge upswing in popularity in recent years. Young families have been clamouring for the cottage-style bungalows and two-storey homes that sit on generously sized lots. Though the influx of new blood is already sparking change (new businesses are slowly moving onto Lake Shore), the city has even bigger plans for the region. A revitalization program for the area, the Mimico 20/20 Action Plan, aims to create more lakeside park space, connect Lake Shore to the lake in more spots and, much to the chagrin of residents who want to keep the small-town feel of the streets, increase density. Though there may be some dramatic changes in the future, Mimico’s side streets still retain a bucolic feel. (2)

 

HISTORY

Mimico was originally known by the First Nations People as “Omimeca,” meaning “the resting place of the wild pigeons.” The Passenger Pigeon is now an extinct species whose memory lives on in the name of this community. (1)

The present day Mimico neighbourhood began to be developed in the 1890’s south of Lake Shore Boulevard, where many of Toronto’s wealthiest families built their summer homes. Some of these estates are still intact however most were lost to development after World War II. (1)

Mimico began to emerge as a year-round community in 1906, when the Grand Trunk Railway opened the Mimico Yard. This led to a building boom as houses were needed to accommodate the influx of workers who found employment at the Mimico Yard. (1)

Mimico’s meteoric growth led to its incorporation as a Town in 1917. Mimico retained its Town status until 1967, when it was amalgamated with the Township of Etobicoke which is now part of the City of Toronto.